22-cerator

Date Discovered: June 14th, 1954

Place of Origin: Typhon Island

Notable Stomping Grounds: Typhon Island

Height: 60 feet

Length: 145 feet

Biology: Cerator belongs to the Paleo Tyrant retrosaur clade – more specifically, he is part of the True Tyrant sub clade.  Even more specifically, he is closely related to Tyrannopyrodons like Tyrantis.  This is easily apparent to anyone well versed in paleontology: while most True Tyrants could hide their teeth beneath their lips, one specific family evolved powerful crushing fangs in their upper jaw, and thus sported a telltale overbite.  Cerator and Tyrantis’s species both belong to this family, as did the most famous extinct Paleo Tyrant species, Dynamosaurus imperiosis and Manospondylus gigas.  Cerator is descended from an earlier and more primitive part of that lineage, as his jaws lack the sheer power of beasts like Tyrantis, and his arms are still fairly large to compensate.

Cerator sports the standard kaiju power set:

  • Super strength
  • An enhanced healing factor
  • Immunity to radiation

Personality: Cerator has never been seen outside the company of his closest friend, a fellow retrosaur kaiju named Allotor.  Despite belonging to different species, the two are inseparable, and it is clear from their interactions that Cerator looks up to Allotor as a sort of leader.  While Cerator isn’t particularly intelligent or crafty, he is strong and resilient as a fighter, and is quick to pick up on what Allotor wants him to do when the duo stumble into a brawl. He is a bit more territorial and defensive than his partner – while the pair rarely start a fight, when they do it is usually Cerator’s fault.

The duo also have an unusual relationship with another retrosaur kaiju: the trickster Colossaraptor.  Colossaraptor loves to annoy the pair, and particularly enjoys Cerator’s flustered reactions to her antics.  Cerator in turn will blindly chase after her, leaving Allotor to plot a way that they can get back at the flighty reptile.  Despite how frequent these conflicts are, they never become serious struggles, and researchers believe it is merely play behavior – albeit a very odd case, as the three individuals in question all belong to different species.